Tag: days out

Discovering Morpeth

Northumberland is home to a number of market towns, each one boasting it’s own unique charm, character and many steeped in Northumbrian history. The town of Morpeth sits on the river Wansbeck and is only a half hour’s drive from St Oswald’s Farm. Morpeth is a bustling market town where history and traditional market town charm and independent retail meets with modern shopping centres and trendy wine bars. The cobbled streets, the markets, the walks and the park area together with a unique heritage all give the town an irresistible beauty.

A visit to any market town must include a spot of retail therapy and Morpeth doesn’t disappoint. You will find the Farmers’ Market in town on the first Saturday every month and the weekly charter market in the Market Place each Wednesday. As well the markets the town is packed with retail offerings, the Sanderson Arcade and the charming precinct together with Rutherford’s department store are perfect for browsing and picking up lovely gifts. There is a superb mix of independent shops together with some of your high street favourites.

If you’re seeking a green space Carlisle Park is centrally located in the town and is open every day so it’s always a great time to visit. It includes the William Turner Garden, tennis courts, bowling green, aviary and is home to one of only four working Floral Clocks in the country.

Take a walk up to the castle or there is mature deciduous woodland with lovely, but also very hilly woodland walks, there are even rowing boats if you fancy taking to the water and testing your rowing skills. Or of course Carlisle Park is the perfect spot for a picnic and to sit and watch the world go by!

If you visit in Spring Morpeth’s Bluebell Woods are beautiful when the woodland floor becomes carpeted with bluebells. Properly known as Howburun Woods are names for the How Burn which flows through them into the River Wansbeck. As well as the bluebells, expect to see an array of woodland plants, red squirrels, birds – and the occasional deer.

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Bluebell Woods

As with all Northumbrian Market Towns there is a unique offering of history to enjoy and Morpeth is no different. Northumberland is the only county in England with its own dedicated musical instrument and Morpeth is home to a museum that celebrates and plays homage to our Northumbrian Pipes – a unique part of the heritage of Northumberland. Tucked away in a stunning 13th Century Grade 1 listed building is The Morpeth Chantry Bagpipe Museum which boasts a treasure trove of instruments and along with the fascinating displays, the museum often comes to life with regular live musical performances and ‘meet the piper’ sessions. The Chantry is also home to the Northern Poetry Library and Craft Centre and even the building itself has a story to tell, with townspeople once over having to pay a toll to the local priest to cross the river! You can still see the foundations of the town’s Medieval bridge in the river today.

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The Chantry Museum – Home of the Northumberland Pipes

The town has plenty of free parking and with a great choice of places to eat or grab a coffee it’s the perfect destination for a day out. For more information on visiting this lovely Market Town please go to the More in Morpeth website.

If you enjoy the buzz of a market town just take your pick, as whichever one you choose you’ll be sure of a warm Northumbrian welcome.

Discovering our Museums – Beamish

St Oswald’s Farm is so well placed for days out in Northumberland and there is so much to see and to do and experience across the County and the whole of the North East. So whether you stay for a weekend, a week or two weeks you won’t be short of places to visit and enjoy. If you like to soak up the history and enjoy discovering museums during your time away then Northumberland most definitely won’t disappoint! Our museums are all so very different and many bring to life the lives of the people who once lived and worked here, and none more so than Beamish, an astonishing living and working museum set in over 300 acres of beautiful countryside in nearby Durham.

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The Pit Village – Beamish

Beamish – The Living Museum of the North is a world famous open air museum which tells the story of life in North East England during the 1820s, 1900s, 1940s and 1950s. “A living, working museum that uses its collections to connect with people from all walks of life and tells the story of everyday life in the North East of England”. And my goodness is certainly does, and in the best and most imaginative way ever!

You will step back in time when you visit Beamish, it is nostalgic, authentic, factual, enchanting, everything about it is interactive and engaging, you can’t help but be in awe of it’s scale and fond of it’s charm.

Hop on the tram and discover how families lived and worked in the years leading up to World War 1 in the 1900’s town, it’s everything a town should be. A bank, the printers, a well stocked Co-op, the Masonic Hall, a chemist and the town stables. See vintage cars, motorcycles and bikes in the replica early 1900’s garage, call in at Herron’s Bakery and watch bread and cakes being made using traditional recipes or pop into Jubilee confectioners and see ‘ye olde fashioned sweets’ being made and of course there’s plenty to tempt you if you would like to take some treats to take home. Buy a pint in The Sun Inn, try your hand at games at the fairground or enjoy a picnic by the bandstand in the Town park and if you time it right, the brass band will be playing too.

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Horse and cart at Beamish

Mining was a huge part of North East life and the 1900’s Colliery and Pit Village depict the life of the men and boys and ponies who worked the mines and how families lived in a pit village. Admire the well tended vegetable gardens, grab a takeout at the local fish and chip shop, visit the chapel or go to school, you can even test your skill with the ‘booler’ in the school yard. You might need a Geordie dictionary to know what a booler is!

Jump back on board the bus or tram and head to the 1940’s farm where you can walk through the homes of those living an everyday domestic life during wartime. See how evacuees adjusted to living a rural life and what life was like for the land girls. The farmhouse, the cottage, the old farm implements and buildings, be sure to take note of the pig troughs at the farm, they once resided here at St Oswald’s Farm, and in fact they were where our house is now, before being given to Beamish around 50 years ago.

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Life on the 1940’s farm

A visit to Beamish is a full day out with so much to explore and see and set over such a large area, be sure to wear comfortable shoes, as there’s lots to walk around and you wouldn’t want to miss a single bit! It’s around an hour’s drive from St Oswald’s and we would recommend planning a whole day there to be sure you are able to enjoy it fully. There’s plenty of loos and places to grab a bite to eat and plenty places to sit and enjoy a picnic if you would prefer. For all the details of visiting Beamish please check their website for up to date information and current guidance.

Whatever your interest you’ll be sure to find plenty to see and do in the North East and of course if you need any help or guidance on where to visit you just need to ask and we’ll be happy to help. We look forward to welcoming you here very soon!