Tag: Northumberland

Discovering our Museums – Beamish

St Oswald’s Farm is so well placed for days out in Northumberland and there is so much to see and to do and experience across the County and the whole of the North East. So whether you stay for a weekend, a week or two weeks you won’t be short of places to visit and enjoy. If you like to soak up the history and enjoy discovering museums during your time away then Northumberland most definitely won’t disappoint! Our museums are all so very different and many bring to life the lives of the people who once lived and worked here, and none more so than Beamish, an astonishing living and working museum set in over 300 acres of beautiful countryside in nearby Durham.

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The Pit Village – Beamish

Beamish – The Living Museum of the North is a world famous open air museum which tells the story of life in North East England during the 1820s, 1900s, 1940s and 1950s. “A living, working museum that uses its collections to connect with people from all walks of life and tells the story of everyday life in the North East of England”. And my goodness is certainly does, and in the best and most imaginative way ever!

You will step back in time when you visit Beamish, it is nostalgic, authentic, factual, enchanting, everything about it is interactive and engaging, you can’t help but be in awe of it’s scale and fond of it’s charm.

Hop on the tram and discover how families lived and worked in the years leading up to World War 1 in the 1900’s town, it’s everything a town should be. A bank, the printers, a well stocked Co-op, the Masonic Hall, a chemist and the town stables. See vintage cars, motorcycles and bikes in the replica early 1900’s garage, call in at Herron’s Bakery and watch bread and cakes being made using traditional recipes or pop into Jubilee confectioners and see ‘ye olde fashioned sweets’ being made and of course there’s plenty to tempt you if you would like to take some treats to take home. Buy a pint in The Sun Inn, try your hand at games at the fairground or enjoy a picnic by the bandstand in the Town park and if you time it right, the brass band will be playing too.

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Horse and cart at Beamish

Mining was a huge part of North East life and the 1900’s Colliery and Pit Village depict the life of the men and boys and ponies who worked the mines and how families lived in a pit village. Admire the well tended vegetable gardens, grab a takeout at the local fish and chip shop, visit the chapel or go to school, you can even test your skill with the ‘booler’ in the school yard. You might need a Geordie dictionary to know what a booler is!

Jump back on board the bus or tram and head to the 1940’s farm where you can walk through the homes of those living an everyday domestic life during wartime. See how evacuees adjusted to living a rural life and what life was like for the land girls. The farmhouse, the cottage, the old farm implements and buildings, be sure to take note of the pig troughs at the farm, they once resided here at St Oswald’s Farm, and in fact they were where our house is now, before being given to Beamish around 50 years ago.

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Life on the 1940’s farm

A visit to Beamish is a full day out with so much to explore and see and set over such a large area, be sure to wear comfortable shoes, as there’s lots to walk around and you wouldn’t want to miss a single bit! It’s around an hour’s drive from St Oswald’s and we would recommend planning a whole day there to be sure you are able to enjoy it fully. There’s plenty of loos and places to grab a bite to eat and plenty places to sit and enjoy a picnic if you would prefer. For all the details of visiting Beamish please check their website for up to date information and current guidance.

Whatever your interest you’ll be sure to find plenty to see and do in the North East and of course if you need any help or guidance on where to visit you just need to ask and we’ll be happy to help. We look forward to welcoming you here very soon!

Simply Kielder

Kielder could be described as a very small and remote village, it could just be called the home of Kielder Water & Forest or be best known for it’s impressive star studded skies with observatory and International Dark Sky Park status. However, it is also so much more than all of that and there is a wealth of beauty to enjoy and a plenty supply of hidden gems to discover.

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Tranquil Kielder Water (image Kielder Waterside Park)

At over 250sq miles Kielder Forest is the largest man made working forest in England with Kielder Water the largest man made lake in Europe and with them you will find nature, wildlife and natural beauty on a scale you may not have witnessed before. If you wish to seek out the vastness and expanse of this dynamic scenery for yourself there are many ways to enjoy this beautiful part of Northumberland. Take the expansive forest drive or breathe in the clean and fresh Northumbrian air on one of the many walks, you may even opt to bike or walk the 26 mile Lakeside Way! Pay a visit to the nature garden or take advantage of one of the nature hubs with up to date information throughout the year as the forest and it’s inhabitants change through the course of the seasons.

If you want to be prepared and enjoy a guided walk then download the ‘Kielder Water & Forest Park Wild Walks’ app and take your virtual tour guide with you on your own discovery day of this beautiful piece of Northumberland. The ‘guide’ together with view points ensure you know what to look out for and where.

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Kielder Water (image Kielder Waterside Park)

A great place to start any visit is the visitor centre at Tower Knowe, it is ideal for planning your day and for choosing what to see and where to go. Both the visitor centre at Tower Knowe and the visitor centre at Kielder Castle offer refreshments too.

A day out here holds lots of surprises and over the past 25 years it has become home to a unique collection of art, sculptures and architecture. Kielder Belvedere, Skyspace, Wave Chamber, Freya’s Cabin, Janus Chairs, Silvas Capitalis or the newest installation, The Nick. You never know what you might just discover on your travels!

Adventure seekers need look no further than this vast offering. The options to get out and get active are second to none, with cycling, mountain biking, canoeing, sailing, water skiing, snorkeling, fencing, archery, horse riding and even activities such as high ropes and zip wire, there is something there for all adrenaline junkies.

So whether you want to quietly enjoy the surrounding nature by taking a leisurely drive or a relaxed trip on the Osprey Ferry across the water to take in the views, or maybe you would just love to catch a glimpse of an Osprey or learn about Water Voles and the ‘Saving Ratty’ project or you want to delve into the vast forest park and see the architectural structures now firmly at home there, or you really want your day out to be about getting down to some serious activities, Kielder will not disappoint.

Kielder is without doubt beautiful but it is remote and we would always recommend checking the Visit Kielder website before you travel for up to date guidance on opening times, any restrictions and weather updates. The website is full of useful information and guides, and you will find some of these guides printed off for your use in the cottage. Please do note that when you visit Kielder a phone signal will not be easily found!

When you stay at St Oswald’s Farm Kielder is about an hour away with the drive there taking you through some of the most amazing and picturesque countryside. Book your next stay with us and be sure to put Kielder on your must do list.

Stay and Golf

If golf is your game then a stay in Northumberland means you will quite literally be spoilt for choice with nearby courses offering everything from scenic and picturesque to wild and remote and even some internationally renowned. Our courses are varied and offer something for everyone and Northumberland promises courses suitable for all abilities and budgets. So whether you’re looking to just try your hand at golf or just give your clubs an airing whilst holidaying in Northumberland or if you’ re hoping for a different course and different challenge each day, then we can definitely oblige.

Stay and Golf in Northumberland

Allendale golf course sits amongst the hills in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and at it’s highest point reaches 1374ft and is one of highest courses in England. It’s position ensures a remote yet beautiful aspect with fawn and fauna in abundance so don’t be surprised if the odd hare or deer takes interest if you’re nearing the rough.

The picturesque North Tyne Valley is home to Bellingham golf course, a highly regarded 18 hole, 70 par course which provides breathtaking views over the valley and towards Kielder. With a mix of par threes, long par fives and some challenging par fours, you’re assured variation until the very last putt.

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Tynedale Golf Course, Hexham

The local town of Hexham boasts not one but two courses, Tynedale a 9 hole course that sits neatly on Tyne Green, it provides a small tree lined and almost flat course. To the west of the town you will find Hexham Golf Club which is set in acres of pretty countryside overlooking the River Tyne. The Club offers a stunning and memorable venue, with what is said to be the best opening hole in the County and then follows up with a challenge on every green. If you want to brush up on what’s in store hole by hole, their website provides top tips and even ensures you know where to enjoy the best views.

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Hexham Golf Club course – image credit Hexham Golf Club

Northumberland also lays claim to championship courses, Slaley Hall, a 36 hole golf complex with their USGA standard, multi championship ‘Hunting Course’ and set on higher slightly windier ground their ‘Priestman Course’ which has hosted many European Tours. Both Hunting and Priestman offer a challenging but scenic round.

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Slaley Hall

Matfen Hall lies only a 15 minute drive from St Oswald’s and boasts a stunning 27 hole Championship course across beautiful classic parkland incorporating some challenging water features and is regarded as one of the finest courses in Northumberland.

Further East along the Tyne Valley you will find not one but two Lee Westwood courses in the grounds of Close House near Wylam, the Colt Course and the Filly Course alongside a 9 hole Yearling course. Close House was developed by local businessman Graham Wylie who has ensured it has a place on the global golf map and and has hosted the European British Masters and is the only PGA Academy in the North East of England.

Wherever you choose to play you will be sure of a warm welcome to the course and of course to the 19th hole, you will be playing surrounded by vistas that are so staggeringly beautiful you might struggle to keep your eye on the ball! Book your stay in Heavenfield Cottage, take your pick from our fantastic golfing offer, arrange those tee off times and enjoy golf Northumberland style!

Autumn walks

Isn’t Autumn just the most glorious time of the year? Crunchy leaves, misty mornings, crispy air and with a myriad of colours sweeping over our trees, woodlands, gardens, hedgerows, fields and even across our skies. Autumn is definitely not the time to hibernate.

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Early morning at St Oswald’s Farm

Northumberland is renowned for its walks and trails right across the County from coast to country, from remote moorlands to river walks, Northumberland offers the very best in walking opportunities. For hardened walkers Autumn brings a new dimension to each walk with a kaleidoscope of colours to indulge in and for those who enjoy more of a gentle stroll there’s no better time than Autumn to breathe in the great outdoors. Whatever your walking level or experience we can guarantee Northumberland has a walk for you.

You don’t need to travel far from our back door to enjoy the River Tyne. One of Hexham’s nicest green spaces is Tyne Green and it is the most tranquil of places to enjoy, this long river walk at any time of the year is lovely but bathed in Autumn glory it’s nothing short of beautiful.

Further east, the River Tyne takes you to Wylam and to Hagg Bank which is dominated by an impressive single span arch bridge, this former railway bridge is now a footbridge only. The walk East, Keelman’s Way (cycle route 141), stretches from Wylam to Newburn and can be accessed from either end or you may wish to explore the river stretch from Prudhoe to Wylam taking in sights such as George Stephenson’s Cottage and Prudhoe Castle along the way. A copy of this handy guide of the walks along this river stretch is also available in the cottage.

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Hagg Bank at Wylam

The walks at Allen Banks & Staward Gorge are a must-see in Autumn. The gardens and woodlands are owned by the National Trust and are the largest area of ancient semi-natural woodland in Northumberland. This beautiful wooded gorge that follows the River Allen has many different walks to enjoy with miles of paths, most are signed, however some are fairly steep and in places can be a little uneven. Amongst this ancient and ornamental woodland not only will you discover wildife and fauna but also ancient monuments and perhaps even a summer house! Make sure to grab a map available from the car park to keep you on the right path. For current opening times and to check on any restrictions please check their website before visiting. Top tip – afterwards head to Bardon Mill Village Store & Tearoom for hot drinks, light lunches and cake!

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Allen Banks & Staward Gorge in Autumn

The Simonside Hills in Northumberland National Park are perhaps the most recognisable hills in the County and as the Autumn months approach they bring just an expanse of purple beauty across the heather moorland. There is a circular 7km walk to the summit and although the route across the woodlands and moor are classed as moderate it is oh so worth it. At the summit you will encounter 360 degree view and be able to take in the Cheviot Hills, Coquetdale and over to the North Sea coastline. You will find details of parking and route guidance on the National Park website.

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Simonside Hills

It’s hard to choose our favourite place to visit in Autumn, Gibside with its long tree lined avenue or the charm of Belsay Hall and the colours that appear across the gardens and surrounding woodlands at this time of year. Or perhaps our favourite is Cragside House & Gardens which despite the many evergreens amongst their 7 million trees they just seem to highlight and compliment the display of Autumn colours. Talkin’ Tarn is lovely for a gentle walk around a lake but then so is Bolam Lake and there’s Blanchland …if only Autumn lasted longer. There’s always next year when nature will do it for us all again!

Whatever or wherever you choose to walk during your Autumn stay we can guarantee you will ‘fall’ for the charm of Northumberland.

Heavenfield Cottage is the perfect base for all your Autumn days out and just perfect to return back to following a day in the great outdoors. With underfloor heating, a log burning stove, a deep double ended bath, walk-in rainforest shower, fluffy bathrobes, the biggest most comfortable bed with luxury bedding, oh and there’s even somewhere to dry your boots! Sound good? All our Autumn availability for this year and next year can be found here.

We look forward to welcoming you to St Oswald’s Farm.

King of Castles

So, where is the King of Castles? Well without doubt it has to be Northumberland which boasts more castles than any other county in England, a clear legacy of its turbulent past including the infamous Border wars which raged from the 14th to 16th centuries. Northumberland is home to over 70 castle sites and although some of the buildings have now gone many remain, some in all their grandeur yet some only in ruin, leaving only a hint of what once was.

No trip to England’s northernmost County would be complete without a visit to at least one of these remarkable reminders of the history which Northumberland lays claim to. No matter where you stay or where your days out take you, you can rest assured there will be a castle just around the corner.

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Alnwick Castle – image D Bartlett

A trip to the North of Northumberland brings delights such as Alnwick Castle which is the second largest inhabited castle in England after Windsor Castle and is home to the 12th Duke of Northumberland. This historical and impressive monument stands inland and holds guard over the River Aln with the impressive grounds surrounding the castle landscaped by none other than Lancelot “Capability” Brown. The castle itself has featured in over 40 films and TV shows including two of the Harry Potter films. Visit the lavish state rooms, enjoy the exhibitions or take up the chance to have a guide with one of the daily talks and tours or there’s always the opportunity for a spot of broomstick training for those would be wizards!

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Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle is undoubtedly one of the most iconic sights on the North East coastline with the unmistakable fortress which has stood guard high on its rocky plateau for over 1400 years, it is quite the the formidable structure sitting above the small and very beautiful village of Bamburgh. A vast history ensures there is plenty to enjoy from the state rooms to the keep, and from the armoury to the museums, halls and even the stables, it’s a treasure trove of delights.

North Northumberland is home to many magnificent castles, Warkworth Castle is just off the coast and with it’s cross shaped keep it sits proudly above the River Coquet and has it’s own Hermitage & Chapel with can be visited but accessible only by boat. The ruins of the once dominating Dunstanburgh Castle stand on a remote headland between Embleton and Craster and can be reached by taking the short coastal walk from Craster village.

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Warkworth Castle

As you would expect with over 70 sites there are castles to be found all over the County and St Oswald’s Farm is within a very short drive of some really lovely castles. Aydon Castle is a real treat and quite literally 10 minutes from us, this fortified manor house is almost intact and is set in secluded woodland and with it’s own walled garden it’s the perfect spot for a picnic. A short drive further east along the picturesque Tyne Valley you will find Prudhoe Castle which was built in the late 11th century can be found on the South bank of River Tyne, both are English Heritage properties and have good amenities.

The castles across the County are vastly different and all with their own unique story to tell, it’s easy to get lost in time and imagine a life long ago. So whether you visit the ruins of Belsay Castle or cross the water to Holy Island to discover Lindisfarne Castle or seek the thrill of ghost hunting at Chillingham Castle you will undoubtedly have an unforgettable day out as you explore our past.

Northumberland is looking forward to welcoming you back really soon and when it’s safe to do so. When planning your stay and days out please check with venues themselves for their opening times and new procedures for welcoming visitors.

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We can’t wait to welcome guests back to St Oswald’s Farm and will be putting everything in place to ensure you can book with confidence and enjoy a safe stay.

Why not book your stay now and start making your plans for 2021.

All our prices and availability can be found on our website and of course if you have any queries or there is anything we can help please just get in touch. We look forward to seeing you soon and until then stay safe!